Most Common Canine Visits

Here at City Veterinary Hospital we value you and your pet’s well being. You know your pet best, and we count on you to know when your pet is not acting herself or seems uncomfortable. It is important to us that you know how to keep your pet safe and healthy because your pet’s care starts at home.

It can be hard to know when your pal needs to come in for a visit. We have put together some information for you to help determine when it is necessary to come in and what you might expect at your visit. Each pet and each visit is special but we can share with you our most commonly seen ailments.

If you are unsure at any time, please do call us. We are here for you and your fur babies!

It can be hard to know when your pal needs to come in for a visit. We have put together some information for you to help determine when it is necessary to come in and what you might expect at your visit. Each pet and each visit is special but we can share with you our most commonly seen ailments.

If you are unsure at any time, please do call us. We are here for you and your fur babies!

1. Skin Allergies

In humans, an allergy to pollen, mold, or dust makes people sneeze and their eyes itch. In dogs, rather than sneeze, allergies make their skin itchy. We call this skin allergy “atopy”. Commonly, the feet, belly, folds of the skin, and ears are most affected. Symptoms typically start between the ages of one and three and can get worse every year. Licking the paws, rubbing the face, and frequent ear infections are the most common signs. The good news is that there are many treatment options available for this condition.

Keep an eye out for:

Excessive licking or chewing, pawing at face and/or ears, head shaking, face rubbing

2. Ear Infections

Allergies, swimming, overgrowth of hair in the ear canals, or an accumulation of earwax can all predispose your dog to ear infections, which are painful and annoying. Dogs are very often afflicted by allergies, which cause itching and inflammation in the ears and elsewhere. The earlier this disease is diagnosed, the less discomfort and pain he will suffer. Be sure to call your veterinarian if you notice him scratching or shaking his head, a foul odor from the ears, or if his ears seem painful to the touch. Monitoring for ear infections and treating them early, helps reduce the chances of eardrum damage that can lead to deafness. Most ear infections tend to recur until the underlying cause is determined and controlled.

Keep an eye out for:

Scratching or shaking of the head, foul odor from ears, ears that seam painful to the touch

3. Arthritis

Many older dogs have arthritis, and bigger dogs tend to have more pain and disability than smaller dogs. Some breeds are particularly prone to developing arthritis, for which your veterinarian will need to use many treatments. The earlier treatment is started, the better the results. Good nutrition and proper exercise are also very important to help reduce bone and joint problems as your pet gets older.  Do not let him become overweight; this puts a huge strain on the joints.

Keep an eye out for:

Stiffness or reluctance to rise/sit/use stairs

4. Upset stomach

Some dogs seem to have guts made of steel, while others have loose stools every time they eat something new. It’s not his fault, though, some dogs are known for digestive problems. You might say diarrhea runs in his genes. To help prevent symptoms, feed a prescription pet food that your veterinarian recommends. Most importantly, avoid snacks and table food. Treats that are high in fat (like people food), sodium, or artificial ingredients are bad for your buddy’s digestion.

Keep an eye out for:

Diarrhea

5. Bed wetting

Bedwetting is as embarrassing for your pet as it is for anyone else. Sometimes a spayed female (or more rarely, a neutered male) will have episodes of leaking urine when sleeping. This may be suggestive of urinary incontinence, though other issues can cause similar symptoms. Urine infections can also complicate matters, so the urine must be checked. This, along with a urine culture and veterinary examination are basic tests that should be done on all “leaking” pets. Failure of the urinary sphincter to function adequately can be due to a variety of reasons most commonly related to hormones in the body. Medications may be used to control this disorder and in more extreme cases surgery may be necessary. Testing your friend’s urine every year allows your veterinarian to have a baseline before symptoms start, which helps ensure more prompt treatment if your pet develops a leak.

Keep an eye out for:

Urine leakage when sleeping or lying down

 

Content powered by Genesis Breed-Specific Healthcare ©

genesis

 

We invite you to view these educational videos that give you an interactive inside look at your pet’s health.
finaldental

 

 

 

 

 

fleacontrol

 

 

 

 

 

 

GoldenYearsface

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

catvaccines

 

 

 

 

 

Please browse and share these articles written by our own City Vet Family and published in Texas Dogs and Cats magazine.

Canine Genetics written by Shannon Pigott

Water Safety written by Shannon Pigott

Belly Bulge written by Shannon Pigott

Pet Emotion written by Shannon Pigott